TurnKey Linux Virtual Appliance Library

Why Rackspace open sourced OpenStack

Making TurnKey easy to deploy on as many public and private clouds is an important goal for us. We're going to soon be expanding the number of image formats TurnKey officially support to include more major contenders in this space. We'd also like to establish a mirror network that supports rsync so that service providers will find it easy to get up-to-date images of all TurnKey appliances. By the way, if an rsync mirror is something you would find valuable, drop me a line.

How TKLBAM hooks work

Most TKLBAM users probably don't realize this, but TKLBAM has a nifty, general purpose hooks mechanism you can use to trigger useful actions on backup and restore.

Examples of hooks:

  • Cleaning up temporary files
  • Stopping/starting services to increase data consistency
  • Encoding/decoding data from non-supported databases
  • Using LVM to create/restore a snapshot of a fast changing volume

On my Kindle I am root

Starting from the end

That's my Kindle in the screenshot running a full screen terminal. I'm about to run nmap (a network mapping program) inside a chrooted Debian ARM installation I put on the device. Having Debian on the device isn't really necessary for hacking the Kindle but it does make it easier to install ARM binaries of just about any of the 25,000 packages in Debian. Yep, apt-get works on my Kindle!

Be nice. It's a fscking gift

Open source development is usually fun and rewarding. You get to work on whatever you like. No permission required. No "business justification". Here's this thing I've created, isn't it neat? There's a deep sense of satisfaction in making things. Especially when other people find them useful. It's also pretty awesome when people decide what you've made is interesting enough that they want to join in and help make it better. Successful projects often form into communities. Strangers from all over the world turned into enthusiastic users, co-developers. Friends.

The only parts that suck are that:

  1. It is a bit more difficult to make a living purely from open source software. Giving stuff away generally doesn't pay very well.
  2. Some people just don't get it.