TurnKey Linux Virtual Appliance Library

No Juju for you! Ubuntu's Not Invented Here syndrome

Today Brian emailed me to share his enthusiasm for the Ubuntu Juju project, developed by Canonical, the company that makes Ubuntu.

Brian is a good friend that has been advising us on all matters TurnKey practically since the project began. His advice and feedback is always well informed and insightful so even when I already have my own opinions on the matter, I still take the time to look into his suggestions carefully. Thanks Brian!

And then there were three...

Hi all! This is my virgin TurnKey blog post. Many of you on the forums would have come across me in your travels no doubt. I have been a volunteer serial poster on the forums now for many years. I have even had the privilege of having a blog post written about me by Liraz (one of the core TurnKey devs).

What's the best way to do free software bounties?

First, I'd like to thank Joey, Noah and Jeremy for providing much needed feedback on a related blog post. Thanks guys. It really got me thinking. What if instead of a contest we figured out how to do community funded bounties? Wouldn't an open, continual system of free software bounties be much a better idea than doing another contest?

What if all Debian/Ubuntu based dists used TKLDev?

Imagine if every Debian distribution in the world in the world was using TurnKey's build chain and collaborating with us on its development instead of limping along with various inefficient ad-hoc tools?

TurnKey currently doesn't get as many contributions back from the free software community as we'd like (our fault). I think there are two main reasons for that:

The pros, cons and alternatives to financial rewards in an open source project

Here's another blog post that started life as a response to a private email Jeremy Davis (JedMeister on the forums) sent me regarding various things we could try to recruit more developers as TurnKey contributors:

TurnKey 13.0 ready for community development

Want to roll your own Debian Wheezy based images? You're in luck because we just finished upgrading TurnKey's build chain, including new versions of TKLDev and TurnKey Core ready for download.

Meet Basil Kurian - 2nd place in TurnKey's first community development contest

Last week we finally published our interview with Adrian Moya, who won first place in the TurnKey community development contest. Basil won the respectable 2nd place and though we didn't know it at the same, more of his contributions would make it into the TurnKey library when we more than doubled it in the TurnKey 12 release.

Meet Adrian Moya - winner of TurnKey's first community development contest

Two years ago Adrian Moya won the first TurnKey community development contest. We decided it would be a good idea to interview him so the community would get to know him better. Unfortunately we made the foolish mistake of deciding to postpone the interview until his submissions made it into the TurnKey library as official appliances. In retrospect I think it would have been best if we did the interview right after Adrian won the contest. Hindsight is always 20/20.

The curious case of Jeremy Davis (AKA JedMeister)

Ah, it's that special time of year again. People all over the world are getting into the holiday spirit. Celebrating the good parts of human nature. Trying to be just a bit nicer to other people. Buying presents for friends and family.

An experiment: gaming Slashdot's moderation system

Or: why moderation systems are trickier than they look.

Understanding the dynamics of online communities is one of my pet interests, so as a regular reader of Hacker News, I took notice when Paul Graham started experimenting recently in an attempt to stave off the gradual but unmistakable decline (AKA redditization) of what used to be my favorite online community after TurnKey.

The discussion inspired me to write a blog post about an experiment I tried a while back at my other geek haunt - Slashdot. Just to throw in my two cents.

In theory comment moderation systems are democratic and promote a high signal to noise ratio. But I've long suspected them of promoting group-think and being easy to game once you understand a little bit about the dynamics at play.