TurnKey Linux Virtual Appliance Library

Mapping AWS data centers for fastest connection

Yes, that's 'fastest', not closest.

Background

A while back I published a blog post entitled Finding the closest data center using GeoIP and indexing, which described how we automatically determine the AWS regional data center to be used for storing encrypted server backups.

TKLBAM: a new kind of smart backup/restore system that just works

Drum roll please...

Today, I'm proud to officially unveil TKLBAM (AKA TurnKey Linux Backup and Migration): the easiest, most powerful system-level backup anyone has ever seen. Skeptical? I would be too. But if you read all the way through you'll see I'm not exaggerating and I have the screencast to prove it. Aha!

Finding the closest data center using GeoIP and indexing

We are about to release the TurnKey Linux Backup and Migration (TKLBAM) mechanism, which boasts to be the simplest way, ever, to backup a TurnKey appliance across all deployments (VM, bare-metal, Amazon EC2, etc.), as well as provide the ability to restore a backup anywhere, essentially appliance migration or upgrade.

Note: We'll be posting more details really soon - In this post I just want to share an interesting issue we solved recently.

Exploring S3 based filesystems S3FS and S3Backer

In the last couple of days I've been researching Amazon S3 based filesystems, to figure out if maybe we could integrate that into an easy to use backup solution for TurnKey Linux appliances.

Note that S3 could only be a part of the solution. It wouldn't be a good idea to rely exclusively on S3 based automatic backups because of the problematic security architecture it creates. If an attacker compromises your server, he can easily compromise and subvert or destroy any S3 based automatic backups. That's bad news.