TurnKey Linux Virtual Appliance Library

How do I use TurnKey appliances? (e.g., TurnKey Ruby on Rails) [SOLVED]

I have tried downloading and installed the Ruby on Rails Web framework from this link: http://www.turnkeylinux.org/appliances/rails

I am using Ubuntu 8.10.

After downloading and burning the ISO image to a CD. I rebooted and installed from the Live CD. Everything seemed to be fine. It installed successfully.

But now I can not see any thing in the newly installed operating system. It went into configuration that shows my localhost as 192.168.2.2 and other two addresses.

As I exited, I would be asked to enter rails password. It is black and white screen.

Do I have to uninstall the newly installed Ruby on Rails at my harddisk now?

 

Thanks.

Alon Swartz's picture

attempting to answer your questions...

The 3 addresses displayed in the configuration console are the different ways to connect to the appliance over the network (eg. Webmin is a web management interface which can be used to manage, administer and configure the appliance using your browser).

The black and white screen you are refering to is the shell login prompt - use the root password you configured during the installation.

An example rails application has been configured in /var/www/railsapp, which can be viewed with your browser and includes links to help you get started using ruby on rails.

You can also checkout the rails documentation which currently includes a walk through on deploying the Tracks Rails application.

I hope the above helps.

Is there a way now I try going into desktop?

I have read a topic posted by someone having problem with his JoomLa!. I tried using his solution, hope it was not that bad. I installed Ubuntu-desktop during the shell login prompt. Now that I will face the user login interface -- I think Ubuntu 8.0.4. But I had issue locating my user name and password to enter into the desktop. What do you suggest I can do now?

Thanks, I will probably have to use the tracking walk through, but about the desktop I have installed, will it affect my overall (now) newly installed turnkey Ruby on Rails system?

Sorry, I did not mean not to follow your instructions early on, I just went off line and rebooted to deal with the shell login prompt, and I only had one PC with me, and now that I am reading your answer.

In regards to your first paragraph, you said that I can use the Webmin. I am not understanding here; it is still in shell login prompt, how do I get the browser pop up? Same goes to your third paragraph, how do I use my browser(when I am in shell login prompt) using this /var/www/railsapp ?

I am very new at this. Hope you would bare with me for I will tolerate your 'amount' of time to reply my question.

In my first paragraph, I was saying that I have further messed up by installing Ubuntu-desktop, and now whenever I need to go back to shell login prompt, I will have to do something else which I am not sure.

Is there still any possible solution?

Thank you very much.

:)

Liraz Siri's picture

You seem to be misunderstanding software appliances...

You should be able to log into your desktop with the root account (e.g., the username is 'root') you set the password for during installation.

Installing ubuntu-desktop won't effect the server functionality, however I would like to clarify a few things since you don't seem to understand how a software appliance is supposed to be used.

TurnKey software appliance are designed to be run as a server and accessed/configured remotely, from another computer, which can be either a real physical machine or a virtual machine (e.g., using virtualization software such as VMware or VirtualBox)

The web management interface we use is an application called Webmin, which is a web application that is supposed to be accessed from a web browser (e.g., Firefox or Internet Explorer) running on another computer. In other words, to make this very plain, you would put the URL displayed in the appliance's configuration console into the browser's address bar.

You on the other hand, seem to be trying to use our appliances as a desktop client in addition to the server roles. That's possible, but it isn't really a good idea, unless you really know what you are doing.

Finally, you may also be misunderstanding what Ruby on Rails is. It isn't an application you can access. It's a web framework you develop for. The railsapp Alon was referring to is an example program for the Ruby on Rails framework.

See the Ruby on Rails website for further information.

Also, if you are a beginner you may find it helpful to refer to the Ubuntu documentation to get a better understanding of how things are supposed to work.

Good luck!

My misunderstanding indeed. Very much.

You should be able to log into your desktop with the root account (e.g., the username is 'root') you set the password for during installation.

Which desktop is that refering to? Yes, I do remember my password during I set up.

TurnKey software appliance are designed to be run as a server and accessed/configured remotely, from another computer, which can be either a real physical machine or a virtual machine (e.g., using virtualization software such as VMware or VirtualBox)

There was partition activity, so I thought I have installed Ubuntu 8.0.4 with no desktop. My Ubuntu 8.10 now has lesser harddisk space which makes me think another Ubuntu has been installed. Final stage of the installation(Turnkey Ruby on Rails), I was recommended to set up GrubBoot. Fine, it allows me to see all available operating systems I have now.

The web management interface we use is an application called Webmin, which is a web application that is supposed to be accessed from a web browser (e.g., Firefox or Internet Explorer) running on another computer. In other words, to make this very plain, you would put the URL displayed in the appliance's configuration console into the browser's address bar.

Which browser's address bar in what operating systems? I have tried it in Ubuntu 8.10 and error message is shown. it did not make sense also since I installed it in another partition. If it was from the shell login prompt, then how exactly do I find the browser there?

I am really sorry for the trouble and for my lack of knowledge. It is 1.06AM here, I am going to make a nice try now rebooting and attempt to check any browsers in the shell login prompt before I go to sleep. I hope to get more guidelines if any from here.

Thank you very much.

Desktop, I can not turn back to the Shell login prompt now

About 5 hours ago, I was going through this installation, Ruby on Rails Web framework. I have installed Ubuntu-desktop which was not necessary. Now it is appearing whenever I boot the systems. Could you teach me how should I continue now? Thanks very much.
Liraz Siri's picture

You made a bit of a mess...

You said you installed the ubuntu-desktop package after installing the appliance to you hard-drive, which means you should be seeing an Ubuntu desktop start after boot.

Even if you installed ubuntu-desktop the configuration console should still be running on a different virtual console. Try pressing CTRL-ALT-F7 or CTRL-ALT-F8 and see if you can get back to it.

Anyhow, in principle you should be able to log into the desktop you installed and then use a browser to access the example web application and web management interface. The urls you need are displayed by the configuration console.

I didn't realize before that you installed TurnKey Rails in a dual-boot configuration. We don't really recommend users do that unless they know what they are doing.

From your message it sounds like you only have one computer so what you should have done is use virtualization software to run the appliance in a virtual machine. You can read more about that by following these links:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86_virtualization
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/VirtualMachines
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Virtualisation

We use VirtualBox, which can be installed in Ubuntu like this:

sudo apt-get install virtualbox-ose

You'll probably want to setup bridge networking if you want to access the appliance running in a guest VM from the host computer.

Your other option is to install the appliance in a spare physical machine you might have lying around.

TurnKey Appliances are applicable for Ubuntu 8.10?

Hi liraz,

Thanks for your explanation. Are the appliances I can still use if I am using Ubuntu 8.10? because I read in your website saying that it is for 8.0.4LT Hardy?

I am not sure about that if I can still use these wonderful appliances.

I have a laptop which I can use as my physical machine. But I am also thinking of Virtual machine now. I do not understand what are differences between this two options.

Also, about the running the CD I burned on Live, or "Installing" it. What are the differences, really?

It is really late, 4AM. here I need to sleep now. Thanks very much, liraz.

Liraz Siri's picture

More answers, but the best way to learn is to experiment

1) A software appliance is self contained. In other words, the appliance includes just enough operating system to run the desired application:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_appliance

If you install to a virtual machine, you'll be able to run the appliances on any version of any operating system (Ubuntu, Windows, etc.)

2) In Live mode the system runs entirely in RAM. Consequently, if you run the appliances in Live mode, you'll loose all changes and data when you reboot, because they are not saved on your hard-drive. For this reason, we recommend running in Live mode for demo/training purposes only. You'll need to install to hard-drive if you want to make any changes that survive a reboot.

3) To understand the difference between virtual machines and physical machines you'll have to learn more about virtualization technology. In a nutshell the biggest difference is that using virtualization software you can run multiple virtual machines (each with its own operating system) on a single physical machine. Anyhow, the best way to learn is to read up on the subject (you can start with Wikipedia) and then get your hards dirty and experiment. If you haven't done that, asking someone to explain it to you probably won't help.

Good luck!

Thank you I need some more answers. :)

2) In Live mode the system runs entirely in RAM. Consequently, if you run the appliances in Live mode, you'll loose all changes and data when you reboot, because they are not saved on your hard-drive. For this reason, we recommend running in Live mode for demo/training purposes only. You'll need to install to hard-drive if you want to make any changes that survive a reboot.

How do I really run in Live mode? I have entered the CD in my hard drive, nothing prompts me to run the CD. I have to re-boot it in order to see the TurnKey interface. Even so, I run Live mode from there, nothing really seems to happen except I am able to find the three addresses. When I exit, this will appear:

root@rails:~#

You'll need to install to hard-drive if you want to make any changes that survive a reboot.

How exactly do I install now, before I really have to set partition again? Can you write some step-by-step guidelines?

I do not really want to end up dual-booting an installation again.

I am convinced enough to use Virtual machine now after reading a few times now. Where do I go from here? Install to my hard drive or install a virtual machine first?

Thank you very much

Three to choose

1.http://wiki.rubyonrails.org/rails/pages/RailsOnUbuntu

2.https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RubyOnRails

3.http://www.turnkeylinux.org/appliances/rails

I may have sounded like I was simply hanging around, having nothing to do. Reasons I will testify that I am not, are I was bombarded with information regarding Ruby on Rails. I have come from a Windows background, and I have managed to put up this framework there. I am now trying to do it on a Linux machine.

I really have no idea which instructions I should follow. There were other links I have come across through a book, but it has become almost irrelevant -- the book since 2007.

I have "some" resources that "may" already enough to help me write some wonderful ruby programs in this framework, a project I am currently attempting in my three weeks long holiday. The hurdle is that -- this. I am still figuring out the(a) way, or the(a) right way to set up this framework.

Any help I will really appreciate. Thanks very much. Really. Good Luck.

:)

Liraz Siri's picture

Without understanding the basics you won't get far

The easiest way to get up and running with Rails on Linux would probably be with our TurnKey Ruby on Rails appliance, but you seem to be missing a lot of prerequisites that you would need in order to understand how to use it.

Unfortunately, we don't have the resources to hold everybody's hand so you'll need to be resourceful and patient while you climb the learning curve, mostly by experimenting and teaching yourself. If you can afford it, you might want to consider attending a course that will teach you the basics on Linux, web development, Ruby, and Ruby on Rails.

Please understand that without a basic understanding of how all of this works you won't get very far regardless of how hard we try to explain it, and unfortunately we have many other things on our plate - such as developing new appliances, fixing bugs and adding new features.

Here's one last try to set you off in the right direction: in a nutshell, our software appliances are pre-packaged, pre-integrated, pre-configured, ready-to-use servers that we build to serve specific purposes such as, for example, hosting Ruby on Rails applications.

In other words, if you install Ubuntu server into a real or virtual machine, you get a server that is starts out as a blank slate - it doesn't yet do anything, and to get it to do something useful you'll need to install packages, tweak configuration files, etc. By contrast, when you install a TurnKey appliance you'll get an Ubuntu server that we've already setup to be capable of doing something useful (e.g., host a Rails application). For most people, this is useful because it can save them a few hours of work setting things up themselves. However if you don't already know what to do with a server that can host Rails applications it probably won't be useful to you. Sorry.

Linux-based servers don't usually have or need desktop GUI (Graphical User Inteface) components, which is why you will never reach the "rails" application you seem to be looking for. Perhaps you are expecting an integrated development environment such as Visual Studio. Stop - you won't find it. You're supposed to use our appliances as a server back-end, not as a development front-end.

Building a Ruby on Rails development studio might not be a bad idea in itself, but thats not what TurnKey Ruby on Rails is currently for. If we do that in the future, I'll send you an email (seriously).

Before that happens, a time may come when you might want to setup a Linux server that will host a rails applications that you or someone else has developed. At that point TurnKey Ruby on Rails might be useful to you.

Finally, next time, I recommend that if you just want to experiment with setting up a Linux server, you do it in a virtual machine so you won't have to dual boot and won't mess up your hard-drive partitions. Unfortunately, I don't have step-by-step instructions for fixing that.

Need for Gui desktop on a server.

There is an open source application, Open Laszlo, which allows you to create flash files, or alternatively, DHTML files.

The reason for installing Turnkey Linux LAMP was to provide a back end for the web site which serves the DHTML files.

Open Laszlo depends on the Java Development Kit. To install the Java Development kit, one needs to at least have an X windowing system installed.

The decision to go with ubuntu-desktop was to keep appliance as consistent as possible with the Ubuntu base, so hopefully I won't encounter compatibility problems.

I noticed that the Ubuntu desktop contains a bunch of stuff I will be removing, such as games, etc.

Possibly there is a niche for a LAMP with JDK turnkey.

Please note the posting elsewhere in this thread concern apt-get update

I overlooked this, and wasted a lot of time because I kept getting error messages such as:

E: Couldn't find package ubuntu-desktop

Never too old to learn something new!
Liraz Siri's picture

JDK doesn't need X - it just needs X libraries

If you install ubuntu-desktop into one of our appliances you will have to fetch 458MBs of dependencies.

OTOH, if you install the JDK or the JRE you will have to fetch 42MB or 33MB worth of dependencies.

JDK/JRE depend on a few X libraries. They don't actually depend on X itself.

BTW, we have plans to release two Java application server appliances - an Apache Tomcat server and an JBoss appliance. It's pretty high up on our list of new appliances so it should happen soon.

Best Advice I ever received so far during my break 2 Weeks to go

Thanks so much. Although I am picking things up real slow, I am going to invest some time in learning the topics you have mentioned. Good luck in your projects, liraz, you and your dedicated, professional team members' appliances are really useful in such a way by creating such a good service for web-developers.

G.

Some clarification please?

http://www.turnkeylinux.org/docs/rails/deploying-tracks-application

In the link above, I found on "Stop the mongruel cluster", it is

/etc/init.d/mongrel_cluster start

Should we put stop at the end, instead?

Thanks.

Alon Swartz's picture

oops! good catch

Fixed. Thanks for catching that!

Thanks very much.

Hi alon, thanks I thought I was really having some problem even reading your codes.

Anyway, I have been doing the installation on a hard disk on a physical machine. As I reached the part after stopping the mongrel. I was going through the prerequisites installation.

I typed this after the root@rails:~#

apt-get update

but it said

Could not resolve "archive.ubuntu.com"

W: Failed to fetch http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu....

Have my installation went wrong?

Thanks, greatly

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