Greg Milligan's picture

Hi all, especially Jeremy Davis, I have a fairly simple task that trying to grasp LVM is making very difficult. I have an older Windows machine that will be a TKLFileserver with a bit of help. Its based on an older P4 with 2GB ram and three hard drives that are a 250 GB and 2 500 GB. I wanted to use 25 GB of the 250 for the TKL install with the rest of it and the 2 500s as the storage. I thought LVM was going to be my answer but I have been struggling now for a couple of days. It sounded simple enough, like dynamic volumes in Windows but I guess I don't have enough info to go by. 

I managed to install it but the fine tuning and getting the two 500 GB drives and the remaining space on the 250 GB drive involved is turning into quite a task. 

Forum: 
Jeremy Davis's picture

Have a look at this blog post by Liraz. It's pretty straight forward IMO and should get you to where you want to be... If you have any specific questions or issues, post back here (or over there - whatever seems most relevant, perhaps bump this thread regardless as I sometimes miss comments on blog posts...) and I'll see what i can do! :)

Snickasaurus's picture

Greg give it a read and see if helps your task at hand.

 

 

http://superuser.com/questions/454659/extending-lvm-partition-on-debian-...

Greg Milligan's picture

This site helped a lot: http://www.howtoforge.com/linux_lvm . I had it working in my office but after I shut it down and moved it into the basement in the rack after I powered it up it doesn't work. I was using the torrent server version. On the next attempt I will used the standard fileserver version. The toughest part is having more than one hard drive and no documentation.

Jeremy Davis's picture

When Liraz first wrote that post (that I linked to above) I was struggling with LVM and couldn't quite get my head around it... That post made it all click for me.

I still wouldn't call myself an expert, but have fiddled around with LVM quite successfully now on a number of occasions (both within TKL and on a couple of PVE servers) and find it pretty straight forward now...

If you are having specific issues perhaps post about them and we might be able to help with the details...?

eric_hudson's picture

I am also experiencing the same issue. It was working fine at first but after shutting down and powering my device up, it didn't work as it used to.

Jeremy Davis's picture

If you read down this thread further we talk about mounting the logical volumes from fstab. Did you add the required entries?

Snickasaurus's picture

If this machine has enough power why not run XenServer on it so you can host multiple ones? Always nice having an at-home lab to play with. :-)

 

Jeremy Davis's picture

PVE (headless hypervisor server with Web UI) is the gear IMO... I use it at home and for a client and performance is incredible IMO (even on old hardware).

At home I have it installed installed on a 6yo desktop PC; currently have about 20 VMs running on it and performance is incredible consider the old specs.

For my client (my ex workplace); they have much better hardware but still only workstation grade (not 'proper' server hardware) and it's great, reliable and very low maintenance.

PVE supports both OVZ (for Linux) and KVM (for all OS inc Windows). Also TKL OVZ templates are available for download direct through the PVE Web UI! IMO the performance of OVZ containers can not be matched (although I have heard that LXC performance is the same - just haven't confirmed that first hand yet).

Snickasaurus's picture

At one point I actually downloaded it and added it to my ISO Repository in hopes to try it out yet after switching from VMware to XenServer (twice), I was tired of the setup process and just wanted my VM's online again. I've had to stick to XenServer as I'm in process of switching from being an Apple Server Admin, Casper Admin, package builder/testing, script writer and lead VIP support tech to working with our Citrix group (it's become VERY popular and a lot of money was recently dumped into it so I know it will be around for a while). I have a spare machine with a good'ol Core 2 Quad e6600 that I might throw PVE on to test out. Thanks for your post Jeremy as it's remided me of ProxMox all over again.

 

 

Greg, apologies for the post jacking but, glad you got everyhing sorted!

:-)

Jeremy Davis's picture

I'm sorry for hijacking your thread too Greg! Please post back if/when you want some more help/info...

@Snickasaurus - When I originally set up my server at home I was going to use Xen, then I found that too painful so looked at XenServer, but at that point it was still proprietary which turned me off. When I found PVE I loved it! :)

Now XenServer is fully open source, I wouldn't be surprised if it's popularity grows... I recall it looked quite nice and that was a few years ago now...

FWIW my home PVE server is a Core 2 Duo e6400 (with 8GB RAM) and it runs sweet. Some more RAM wouldn't go astray but the CPU is totally fine for my (light) workload (mostly media/file server, a couple of game servers fro my son, a couple of dev servers for myself and my son and otherwise mostly just testing...

Greg Milligan's picture

Hey don't worry about it, I can never have too much info. My problem now is that I landed a bunch of work to the end of the month and don't have as much time for the file server/torrent server. I will still need some assistance since I have three to build and get working. Too tired to reallyget into it tonite. My main issue is that on all of them I have minimum of three hard drives, one for the appliance and two drives for storage. The added drives are what is giving me the most issues. I am addicted to Linux so it looks like TKL will become my friend once I master it.

Greg Milligan's picture

What are the minimum space requirements for the appliances? Would somewhere in the 6 - 8 GB range be enough?

Server1 will be a torrent server, a P4-2.53 GHz with 2 GB ram, with three hard drives, 2 500 GB for storage and a 120 with 8 GB partition for the appliance and the rest part of the LVM as additional storage with the 2 500 GB drives.

Server2 will be similar but in a file server appliance. Here we have a P4 2.8GHz with 4 GB ram with three drives too. But here we have a pair of 1 TB drives and another 120GB with the 6 - 8 GB partition brain and the rest part of the storage partition.

I have 2 more with E6750 dual core processors for other projects as hard drives become available. I should have three 2 TB drives and two 3 TB drives soon. I have been having issues with my WD external network drives dying on me all at once.

Greg Milligan's picture

Sorry guys, nice idea but it doesn't work here. Should be able to use a combined 1.013 TB as LVM but only able to use the small segment of the first drive. It gets nuked tomorrow unless you guys can figure it out. Let me know if you need anything.

Jeremy Davis's picture

I don't understand why you don't just use the same LV for the whole system and add your additional drives to it...? As per described in the blog post I linked to in my first post in this thread... I know that specifically relates to VMs but the theory is exactly the same for real HDDs - I successfully used those instructions when I added additional HDDs to my PVE setup (PVE also uses LVM).

Perhaps I am missing something in your setup scenario, but to me the most logical and straightforward way to do it would be to install from ISO to one of the HDDs (Possibly the 120GB, but wouldn't really matter) then once setup is complete, add the other drives to the LV... Done...!

Jeremy Davis's picture

To test i just installed LAMP to a (K)VM instance with 3 vHDDs (2x5GB & 1x32GB).

I installed to one of the 5GB vHDDs then added the other 2 to the VG, then extended the LV by 30GB. Took me all of about 30 seconds...

root@lamp ~# pvcreate /dev/sdb
  Writing physical volume data to disk "/dev/sdb"
  Physical volume "/dev/sdb" successfully created
root@lamp ~# pvcreate /dev/sdc
  Writing physical volume data to disk "/dev/sdc"
  Physical volume "/dev/sdc" successfully created
root@lamp ~# vgextend turnkey /dev/sdb
  Volume group "turnkey" successfully extended
root@lamp ~# vgextend turnkey /dev/sdc
  Volume group "turnkey" successfully extended
root@lamp ~# lvextend -L+30GB /dev/turnkey/root
  Extending logical volume root to 33.78 GiB
  Logical volume root successfully resized
root@lamp ~# resize2fs /dev/turnkey/root
resize2fs 1.42.5 (29-Jul-2012)
Filesystem at /dev/turnkey/root is mounted on /; on-line resizing required
old_desc_blocks = 1, new_desc_blocks = 3
Performing an on-line resize of /dev/turnkey/root to 8855552 (4k) blocks.
The filesystem on /dev/turnkey/root is now 8855552 blocks long.

Some more info (after I did the above):

root@lamp ~# pvdisplay
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sda5
  VG Name               turnkey
  PV Size               4.76 GiB / not usable 2.00 MiB
  Allocatable           yes (but full)
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              1218
  Free PE               0
  Allocated PE          1218
  PV UUID               TAvLVC-WOH8-RQ8D-hKKI-1vXM-4lZx-yr12Cj
   
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sdb
  VG Name               turnkey
  PV Size               32.00 GiB / not usable 4.00 MiB
  Allocatable           yes 
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              8191
  Free PE               634
  Allocated PE          7557
  PV UUID               JeVWSi-SDGL-06eE-1jmO-r2Oh-fgch-UyLNWJ
   
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sdc
  VG Name               turnkey
  PV Size               5.00 GiB / not usable 4.00 MiB
  Allocatable           yes 
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              1279
  Free PE               1279
  Allocated PE          0
  PV UUID               fYbWJx-Iopz-7oir-MGdr-lNif-yF1J-thNQIT
root@lamp ~# vgdisplay
  --- Volume group ---
  VG Name               turnkey
  System ID             
  Format                lvm2
  Metadata Areas        3
  Metadata Sequence No  6
  VG Access             read/write
  VG Status             resizable
  MAX LV                0
  Cur LV                2
  Open LV               2
  Max PV                0
  Cur PV                3
  Act PV                3
  VG Size               41.75 GiB
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              10688
  Alloc PE / Size       8775 / 34.28 GiB
  Free  PE / Size       1913 / 7.47 GiB
  VG UUID               a6jnNv-GtNM-iwmm-dOI1-b3FP-aGyz-92M6D1
root@lamp ~# lvdisplay
  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Path                /dev/turnkey/root
  LV Name                root
  VG Name                turnkey
  LV UUID                BPVGsI-WX4l-ASMM-mlH7-xfFV-U444-0GkRFM
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Creation host, time lamp, 2014-03-21 06:35:32 +0000
  LV Status              available
  # open                 1
  LV Size                33.78 GiB
  Current LE             8648
  Segments               3
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     256
  Block device           254:0
   
  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Path                /dev/turnkey/swap_1
  LV Name                swap_1
  VG Name                turnkey
  LV UUID                kydCfW-LueL-6l9s-Z6FL-7MRA-B0oe-GWT5SI
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Creation host, time lamp, 2014-03-21 06:35:32 +0000
  LV Status              available
  # open                 2
  LV Size                508.00 MiB
  Current LE             127
  Segments               1
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     256
  Block device           254:1
Greg's picture

Firstly, I thought it was better to separate the OS from the data storage. Boot, swap and root in section A and file storage in its own partition.

And secondly I am recycling several old units, a 1U P4 server with 4 GB ram and room for 3 older IDE drives, my old main computer, a P4 with 2 GB ram and room for 5 IDE drives and I also have 2 E6750 dual core processors and boards for other projects as I aquire more of the new SATA multiterabyte drives. They have the capacity for 2 IDE and 5 SATA.

Finally, I am at a loss for the documentation that I usually like to have around when I tackle a new project. I am not blaming anyone but mvself for not asking my usual battery of questions beforehand. So let me thank you all for your help. 

And as I dive in again Jeremy, using the LVM will act like one big dynamic volume in Windows? Maybe thats the way I need to think. I am used to using partitions to separate not join. 

 

Jeremy Davis's picture

I guess if you wish to backup the data only (not the rest of the OS) using something like rsync, then having the data separate from the OS makes some sense (although as long as it's in a separate folder it wopuldn't make a huge difference).

If you are planning on making use of TKLBAM though it's probably irrelevant (by default TKLBAM will only backup important OS settings and the data).

If you had no plans for backups (and this setup is only for testing and/or hosting non-important data) then I wouldn't think that it would matter either...

The hardware shouldn't matter at all. AFAIK LVM will happily use IDE and/or SATA (and/or SCSI and/or USB sticks/drives and/or pretty much any other read/write storage device).

I had to google Windows dynamic volume to get an understanding of what that was. Once I did then I can say that generally LVM is somewhat similar to Windows 'simple volumes' (if you use LVM with only one disk) and/or 'spanned volumes' (with multiple disks). There are 3 layers to LVM:

  • Physical Volumes [PV]: As the names suggests these relate to the physical harddrives. They can consist of whole unformatted drives (as I used in my example above e.g. /dev/sdb etc) or can be individual partitions (e.g. /dev/sdb1 etc).
  • Volume Groups [VG]: These are one or more groups of PVs.
  • Logical Volumes [LV]: These are somewhat like partitions on normal physical drives.

In the case of a standard default install of TKL to a single drive it goes something like this (not to scale):

MNT:  [--/boot--][------/(root)----------][--swap--][*]
LV:              [--------root-----------][--swap--][*]
VG:              [--------------turnkey---------------]
PV:   [/dev/sda1][-----------/dev/sda5----------------]
HDDs: [------------------/dev/sda---------------------]
*-unused space to allow for snapshots

Note I added the MNT line to show mount points; i.e. /boot is mounted but is not part of the LVM; also that LVM root (aka turnkey-root; often logical volumes are expressed as [VG]-[LV]) is loaded as / (i.e. the filesystem root). /boot is a separate partition as the OS needs to start loading before LVM is up and running.

The scenario I am suggesting would look something like this (not to scale):

MNT:  [--/boot--][-------------------/(root)---------------------][--swap--][*]
LV:              [---------------------root----------------------][--swap--][*]
VG:              [--------------------------turnkey---------------------------]
PV:   [/dev/sda1][/dev/sda5][-------/dev/sdb--------][--------/dev/sdc--------]
HDDs: [------/dev/sda------][-------/dev/sdb--------][--------/dev/sdc--------]
*-unused space to allow for snapshots

An alternate scenario (more like what you are suggesting) could look like this (not to scale):

User: [--/boot--][--/-][swap][*][------------------/srv/storage----------------][*]
LV:              [root][swap][*][----------------------data--------------------][*]
VG:              [---turnkey---][--------------------storage----------------------]
PV:   [/dev/sda1][--/dev/sda5--][/dev/sda6][-----/dev/sdb-----][-----/dev/sdc-----]
HDDs: [-------------/dev/sda--------------][-----/dev/sdb-----][-----/dev/sdc-----]
*-unused space to allow for snapshots

In this scenario you will need to add the remainder of sda along with all of sdb and sdc to a new VG (which I called 'storage'). Then create your new LV within that (I called it 'data') and mount it wherever you want (I used /srv/storage as an example).

You could just make your data storage LV within the turnkey VG, however I don't think that there is any advantage to that usage (IMO you'd be better off just leaving the data and OS together as per the middle suggestion).

Does that give you a little more clarity? Or am I just confusing you more...?

Greg's picture

I sent you a page from an old text I used years ago that might help explain why I think the way I do. Us older farts usually stick to an idea until replaced with another. I really appreciate all of your help and I hope I gave a little back.

Jeremy Davis's picture

The page you sent me probably still has some relevance, but in my (somewhat limited) experience I have never had need to make a separate partition for anything (other than /boot and swap). On Linux Desktops though I have been known to set up a separate /home partition. That allows for OS update without needing to start again... It has also caused me the odd issue though (different config for updated software for example)...

You are most welcome on the help. Hope you can get your systems up and running! :)

Greg Milligan's picture

I need to make one more hurdle to make it work right. When I reboot I lose HHD 2 and 3. Here is a copy of fstab, what did I forget?

 

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
# <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
proc            /proc           proc    nodev,noexec,nosuid 0       0
# / was on /dev/sda1 during installation
UUID=84d250b6-b4ee-44fb-8029-7bf47864f6a9 /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation
UUID=5b42471a-dd80-442a-99e8-956e06db97a3 none            swap    sw              0       0
/dev/fd0        /media/floppy0  auto    rw,user,noauto,exec,utf8 0       0
/dev/torrentserver/share   /var/share     ext4       rw,noatime    0       0

 

I thought the last line would remount automatically but this happened.

 

> pvdisplay
  /dev/torrentserver/share: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 0: Input/output error
  /dev/torrentserver/share: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 4096: Input/output error
  /dev/sdb: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 0: Input/output error
  /dev/sdb: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 500107771904: Input/output error
  /dev/sdb: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 500107853824: Input/output error
  /dev/sdb: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 4096: Input/output error
  /dev/sdb1: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 500106723328: Input/output error
  /dev/sdb1: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 500106805248: Input/output error
  /dev/sdb1: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 0: Input/output error
  /dev/sdb1: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 4096: Input/output error
  /dev/sdc: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 0: Input/output error
  /dev/sdc: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 500107771904: Input/output error
  /dev/sdc: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 500107853824: Input/output error
  /dev/sdc: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 4096: Input/output error
  /dev/sdc1: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 500106723328: Input/output error
  /dev/sdc1: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 500106805248: Input/output error
  /dev/sdc1: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 0: Input/output error
  /dev/sdc1: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 4096: Input/output error
  Couldn't find device with uuid D9Hx3T-LC3F-cr2D-WAxO-37np-gHjW-Vlf2PP.
  Couldn't find device with uuid q6wVRB-cd5Y-mcT6-ZS5D-qto5-b0t0-0GDBUQ.
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               /dev/sda3
  VG Name               torrentserver
  PV Size               102.80 GiB / not usable 1.37 MiB
  Allocatable           yes 
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              26316
  Free PE               18
  Allocated PE          26298
  PV UUID               HK3oax-xt2x-ocoj-3lV3-xF1P-Vx0H-viMu6N
   
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               unknown device
  VG Name               torrentserver
  PV Size               465.76 GiB / not usable 3.02 MiB
  Allocatable           yes (but full)
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              119234
  Free PE               0
  Allocated PE          119234
  PV UUID               D9Hx3T-LC3F-cr2D-WAxO-37np-gHjW-Vlf2PP
   
  --- Physical volume ---
  PV Name               unknown device
  VG Name               torrentserver
  PV Size               465.76 GiB / not usable 3.02 MiB
  Allocatable           yes (but full)
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              119234
  Free PE               0
  Allocated PE          119234
  PV UUID               D9Hx3T-LC3F-cr2D-WAxO-37np-gHjW-Vlf2PP
Jeremy Davis's picture

Are there perhaps issues with those disks... You mentioned they were 2nd hand. Perhaps they've died (although seems unlucky that they both go at the same time...)

I was going to double check on my PVE server but I was trying to get a Xen server hypervisor running nested on top of KVM (for testing) and it seems I've broken KVM so can't currently do any testing. Sorry Greg...

The only other possibility that springs to mind is that the device names may have changed (i.e. not /dev/sdb). Although that seems unlikely as surely at least one of them would have still been the same..Also lookng again it's complaining about both /dev/sdb and /dev/sbd1 - AFAIK you can only use one or the other (device name or partition name), not both...

FWIW your fstab looks fine at a glance.

Greg Milligan's picture

For the most part, you have an idea of what I am after. What I need to know about now is do the three partitions that make up the LVM need to be listed in the fstab file? If so that explains part of my problem. Fstab is a list for auto mount correct? I only see it mentioning part 1, 5 and /dev/mapper/torrentserver-share. Shouldn't all of the following be included:

> blkid
/dev/sda1: UUID="84d250b6-b4ee-44fb-8029-7bf47864f6a9" TYPE="ext4" 
/dev/sda3: UUID="HK3oax-xt2x-ocoj-3lV3-xF1P-Vx0H-viMu6N" TYPE="LVM2_member" missing
/dev/sda5: UUID="5b42471a-dd80-442a-99e8-956e06db97a3" TYPE="swap" 
/dev/sdb1: UUID="D9Hx3T-LC3F-cr2D-WAxO-37np-gHjW-Vlf2PP" TYPE="LVM2_member" missing
/dev/sdc1: UUID="q6wVRB-cd5Y-mcT6-ZS5D-qto5-b0t0-0GDBUQ" TYPE="LVM2_member" missing
/dev/mapper/torrentserver-share: UUID="94ee69c0-e42e-4275-acff-bfc1d0476397" TYPE="ext4" 

 

Jeremy Davis's picture

Yes fstab is basically like a manually configure automount conf file. LVM should know how/which logical volumes relate to the PVs. So for example here is my Proxmox server fstab (I'd give you a better TKL example but as I said my Proxmox server is currently sort of broken...)

root@proxmox:~# cat /etc/fstab
# <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>
/dev/pve/root / ext3 errors=remount-ro 0 1
/dev/pve/data /var/lib/vz ext3 defaults 0 1
UUID=8a31839f-b638-48e1-a4f5-6e35e4d60c6a /boot ext3 defaults 0 1
/dev/pve/swap none swap sw 0 0
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
/dev/pve2/data2 /media/pve2 ext4 defaults 0 1

The current LVs:

root@proxmox:~# lvscan
  ACTIVE            '/dev/pve2/data2' [1.66 TiB] inherit
  ACTIVE            '/dev/pve/swap' [7.00 GiB] inherit
  ACTIVE            '/dev/pve/root' [96.00 GiB] inherit
  ACTIVE            '/dev/pve/data' [812.02 GiB] inherit

The VGs:

root@proxmox:~# vgscan
  Reading all physical volumes.  This may take a while...
  Found volume group "pve2" using metadata type lvm2
  Found volume group "pve" using metadata type lvm2

And the PVs:

root@proxmox:~# pvscan
  PV /dev/sdb1   VG pve2   lvm2 [465.75 GiB / 0    free]
  PV /dev/sdb2   VG pve2   lvm2 [465.76 GiB / 0    free]
  PV /dev/sdb3   VG pve2   lvm2 [465.74 GiB / 163.01 GiB free]
  PV /dev/sdb4   VG pve2   lvm2 [465.76 GiB / 0    free]
  PV /dev/sda2   VG pve    lvm2 [931.01 GiB / 16.00 GiB free]
  Total: 5 [2.73 TiB] / in use: 5 [2.73 TiB] / in no VG: 0 [0   ]

This is a bit of an odd setup I know but it is mostly because I had a heap of 500GB drives that i have since replaced and it was before I totally understood what I was doing so just moved the PVs to partitions on the new 2TB disk.

I hope it is of some value to you...

Also one other thing I just noticed is that you don't have a 'real' partition as /boot. Now AFAIK theoretically you can do what you've done, but best practice is to use a 'normal' real partition for boot (ideally the first partition on the first disk). Otherwise you can have issues. I wonder if your problems is a result of that? Perhaps I wasn't clear enough on that... I hope I haven't confused you...

Also FWIW here is my disks/partitions as per fdisk (notice the warnings/errors - these can be safely ignored, it's just because fdisk doesn understand/can't read the LVs):

root@proxmox:~# fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0005419c

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *        2048     1048575      523264   83  Linux
/dev/sda2         1048576  1953523711   976237568   8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/sdb: 2000.4 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders, total 3907029168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1              63   976751999   488375968+  8e  Linux LVM
/dev/sdb2       976752000  1953520064   488384032+  8e  Linux LVM
/dev/sdb3      1953520065  2930255999   488367967+  8e  Linux LVM
/dev/sdb4      2930256000  3907024064   488384032+  8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/mapper/pve-root: 103.1 GB, 103079215104 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 12532 cylinders, total 201326592 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/pve-root doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/mapper/pve2-data2: 1825.4 GB, 1825361100800 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 221920 cylinders, total 3565158400 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/pve2-data2 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/mapper/pve-swap: 7516 MB, 7516192768 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 913 cylinders, total 14680064 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/pve-swap doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/mapper/pve-data: 871.9 GB, 871895138304 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 106001 cylinders, total 1702920192 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/pve-data doesn't contain a valid partition table

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